FacebookTwitterLinked InContact

NATURAL RESOURCE SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT IN THE WEST

Creating a Sustainable Destination

Creating a Sustainable Destination

Aug 30, 2022

By Kristen Pope

Jackson Hole seeks a better tourism future

Bison on Wind River

Bison on Wind River

Aug 5, 2022

By Janey Fugate

Restoring a wildlife economy and revitalizing culture

Not Fade Away

Not Fade Away

Jul 12, 2022

By Samuel Western

Communities in rural Montana reach beyond agriculture

Living in a Natural Resource Economy

Living in a Natural Resource Economy

May 3, 2022

By Emilene Ostlind

What can Wyoming learn from studies of the “natural resource curse”?

Sagebrush in Prisons

Sagebrush in Prisons

Feb 8, 2022

By Frani Halperin

Inmates are saving an iconic American landscape—and themselves

Free-Range Carbon

Free-Range Carbon

Jan 19, 2022

By Birch Malotky

Not a silver bullet, but maybe a gold standard, a new market tool benefits climate, ecosystems, and people 

A Last Leap Towards Flowers

A Last Leap Towards Flowers

Sep 27, 2021

By Morgan Heim

Who are these animals, their lights gone out? What journeys have fallen apart here?

—Barry Lopez, Apologia

Amphibian Crossing

Amphibian Crossing

Sep 27, 2021

By Rhiannon Jakopak

Carrying salamanders across roadways helps local populations persist

On a rainy April night when temperatures peeked just above freezing, around 30 people spread out along a well-traveled street next to a city park in Laramie, Wyoming.

Repairing a Fragmented Landscape

Repairing a Fragmented Landscape

Sep 27, 2021

By Gregory Nickerson

Interstate 80 severed wildlife habitats 50 years ago. Can we reconnect them?

Ernie’s Road

Ernie’s Road

Sep 27, 2021

Text and images by Claire Giordano 

The engineer behind a lonely desert highway

My mom tells stories of a magic road. It wound from a gleaming blue alpine lake to the desert below. It required no gas, didn’t wear out brakes, and had the most beautiful vistas. 

Intersecting Roads

Intersecting Roads

Sep 27, 2021

Perspective From Corinna Riginos

The need to value and safeguard wildlife movements

Roads may well be humankind’s greatest source of metaphors, inspiration for a plethora of phrases about journeys and all the bumps, bends, twists, and turns along them.

Looking Underground

Looking Underground

May 6, 2020

Tiny soil organisms may hold the key to managing invasive plants

The four members of Gordon Custer’s research group gather around as he walks through the steps of data collection.

Released to the Wild

Released to the Wild

May 6, 2020

Unwanted pets take a toll on ecosystems

Stepping through the tall grass, a family made their way to the edge of Kelly Warm Spring, a geothermal spring with a temperature that hovers around 77 degrees Fahrenheit year-round, in Grand Teton National Park.

Colonel Mustard, by the Dock, with the Bucket

Colonel Mustard, by the Dock, with the Bucket

May 6, 2020

A fish detective, the effort to stop illegal invasive species introductions, and a long history of a fish management culture clash

One summer day in 1992, two teenage boys fishing Lake Mary Ronan watched a man dump a cooler

Bye Bye, Baseline, Goodbye

Bye Bye, Baseline, Goodbye

May 6, 2020

Rethinking our goals for ecosystem conservation

Natural resource managers strive to keep ecosystems functioning on their own.

Time to Revisit our Invasive Species Strategy

Time to Revisit our Invasive Species Strategy

May 6, 2020

Perspective from Governor Mark Gordon

Invasive species are not a new phenomenon, but over the past few decades the West has seen an explosion of all types in all ecosystems.

Federal lands in public hands

Federal lands in public hands

Dec 7, 2018

The long history of Congressional intent to keep public lands public

Bob Keiter is the Wallace Stegner Professor of Law, University Distinguished Professor, and Director of the Wallace Stegner Center of Land, Resources, and the Environment

Your Federal Public Lands

Your Federal Public Lands

Dec 7, 2018

The United States of America is unique in the world for its vast system of federal public lands, which make up more than a quarter of the country’s land area. Those federal lands, mostly concentrated in the 11 westernmost states and Alaska, span everything from rivers and canyons to sagebrush steppe and alpine peaks.

Why We Have Federal Land

Why We Have Federal Land

Dec 7, 2018

The citizens and leaders behind our public land heritage

On June 30, 1864, the US Senate approved a grant of federal land to the state of California, a tract in the Sierra Nevada at the headwaters of the Merced River “known as the Yo-semite valley…with the stipulation…that the premises shall be held for public use, resort, and recreation…for all time.”

National Monuments and Local Concerns

National Monuments and Local Concerns

Dec 7, 2018

What it means to have protected public lands in your backyard

Waves lap the shoreline. An endless stellar canopy shimmers in the ink-colored sky. Smoky fragrance drifts from a campfire, and 20 middle school students sit around the dancing flames.